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Critical Ceramic Raw Materials

  • Murray A. Schwartz
Part of the Materials Science Research book series (MSR, volume 8)

Abstract

Today’s critical raw materials situation rates a high priority in the ceramic engineering and science area. Along with environmental and energy problems, raw material problems continue to increase and become more closely entwined with the other two. There is little question that correcting environmental problems has created new raw material problems and that fuel shortages have curtailed production of some of the energy-hungry ceramic raw materials.

Keywords

Ceramic Industry Barium Carbonate Domestic Resource Mineral Policy Tight Supply 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Murray A. Schwartz
    • 1
  1. 1.Bureau of MinesU.S. Department of the InteriorUSA

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