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Applications of Surface Characterization Techniques to Glasses

  • G. Y. Onoda
  • D. B. Dove
  • C. G. PantanoJr.
Part of the Materials Science Research book series (MSR, volume 7)

Abstract

Of particular concern to us* was the analysis of glass, following various manufacturing procedures, for chemical and structural information at the outermost atomic layers and to depths up to 1000 Å beneath the surface. Depth profiling on this scale was possible by milling away surface layers with a beam of, for example, argon ions while at the same time monitoring the surface with Auger electron spectroscopy1,2 or other techniques depending on the information desired. Each analytical method is sensitive to a particular characteristic of the surface. Thus, ellipsometry3 has provided a means for observing changes in refractive index in the surface region due to polishing or chemical modification. The more recently developed Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) provides identification of chemical species present at the surface, while electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) is particularly for analysis of chemical bonding characteristics4. Infrared spectroscopy as applied to glass corrosion by Hench and collaborators5 and others6 gives information on chemical species and bonding to greater depths, although somewhat less directly. The value of applying a variety of techniques is apparent.

Keywords

Auger Electron Spectroscopy Auger Spectrum Auger Peak Vitreous Silica Lead Borate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Y. Onoda
    • 1
  • D. B. Dove
    • 1
  • C. G. PantanoJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science & EngineeringUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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