Advertisement

The Use of Pressure in Infrared Spectroscopic Studies of Hydrogen Bonding

  • R. J. Jakobsen
  • J. E. Katon
Part of the Developments in Applied Spectroscopy book series (DAIS, volume 10)

Abstract

Until 1965, the use of pressure as a variable in hydrogen bond spectral studies was extremely limited. There were two reasons for this: (1) the high cost and cumbersome nature of high pressure equipment and (2) the early pressure experiments(1) did not show that there was a large frequency shift with increasing pressure for OH vibrations. In fact, Pimentel and McClellan(1) felt that the effect of pressure on OH stretching vibrations was far less important than the effect of other variables such as temperature, concentration, or solvents.

Keywords

Frequency Shift Chloroacetic Acid Hydrogen Bond Strength Vibrational Assignment Hydrogen Bond Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. (1).
    G. C. Pimentel and A. L. McClellan, The Hydrogen Bond, W. H. Freeman and Co., San Francisco, 1960, pp 81–82.Google Scholar
  2. (2).
    J. W. Brasch, Spectrochim. Acta., 21, 1183 (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. (3).
    J. W. Brasch and R. J. Jakobsen, Paper presented at the Ohio State Symposium on Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy, Columbus, Ohio, June, 1965.Google Scholar
  4. (4).
    Y. Mikawa, R. J. Jakobsen, and J. W. Brasch, J. Chem. Phys., 45, 4750 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. (5).
    J. R. Ferraro, S. S. Mitra, and C. Postmus, Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Letters, 2, 269 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. (6).
    N. T. McDevitt, R. E. Witkowski, and W. G. Fateley, Paper presented at the Ninth European Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy, Madrid, Spain, September, 1967.Google Scholar
  7. (7).
    J. W. Brasch, R. J. Jakobsen, W. G. Fateley, and N. T. McDevitt, Spectrochim. Acta., 24, 203 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. (8).
    R. J. Jakobsen, J. W. Brasch, and Y. Mikawa, J. Mol. Structure, 1, 309 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. (9).
    Y. Mikawa, J. W. Brasch, and R. J. Jakobsen, J. Mol. Structure, 3, 103 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. (10).
    Y. Mikawa, J. W. Brasch, and R. J. Jakobsen, Spectrochim. Acta., 27, 529 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. (11).
    R. J. Jakobsen, Y. Mikawa, and J. W. Brasch, Spectrochim. Acta., 25, 839 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. (12).
    J. W. Brasch, Y. Mikawa, and R. J. Jakobsen, Paper presented at the Ohio State Symposium on Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy, Columbus, Ohio, September, 1968.Google Scholar
  13. (13).
    R. J. Jakobsen, Y. Mikawa, and J. W. Brasch, Appl. Spectroscopy, 24, 333 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. (14).
    R. J. Jakobsen and Y. Mikawa, Paper presented at the Mid-America Symposium on Spectroscopy, Chicago, Illinois, May, 1969.Google Scholar
  15. (15).
    I. E. Poliakova and S. S. Raskin, Optics and Spectroscopy, 6, 220 (1959).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Jakobsen
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. E. Katon
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Battelle, Columbus LaboratoriesColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Chemistry Dept.Miami UniversityOxfordUSA

Personalised recommendations