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Combined Flucytosine — Amphotericin B Treatment of Cryptococcosis

  • J. P. Utz
  • I. L. Garriques
  • M. A. Sande
  • J. F. Warner
  • G. L. Mandell
  • R. F. McGehee
  • R. J. Duma
  • S. Shadomy
Part of the Chemotherapy book series (CT, volume 6)

Summary

In a prospective study from May 1971 to November 1973, 20 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis were treated for six weeks with a combination of amphotericin B (20 mg/d) intravenously and flucytosine (5-FC) (150 mg/kg/d) orally. Fifteen patients had culturally documented Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis, and three died of infection early in therapy. Of the remaining 12 patients, eight were alive and well eight to 34 months following therapy, and four died of other causes. None of the surviving patients has relapsed.

Hematologic complications developed in nine patients, three of whom had no underlying lymphoreticular disorder or therapy with known cytotoxic agents. Renal insufficiency of mild degree occurred in only six patients.

A shorter period of hospitalisation and reduction in amphotericin B toxicity suggest that combined therapy is a safe and efficacious alternative to other regimens.

Keywords

Minimal Inhibitory Concentration Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia None None Cryptococcal Meningitis Renal Tubular Acidosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Utz
    • 4
  • I. L. Garriques
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • M. A. Sande
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. F. Warner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. L. Mandell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. F. McGehee
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. J. Duma
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. Shadomy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Divisions of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Departments of Medicine, Medical College of VirginiaVirginia Commonwealth UniversityCharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.McGuire Veterans Administration HospitalRichmondUSA
  3. 3.University of Virginia School of MedicineCharlottesville
  4. 4.School of MedicineGeorgetown UniversityUSA

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