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Tissue Concentrations of Cefazolin in Man

  • E. Sinagowitz
  • K. Pelz
  • A. Burgert
  • W. Kaczkowski
  • H. Sommerkamp
  • M. Westenfelder
Part of the Chemotherapy book series (CT, volume 5)

Summary

The antimicrobial efficacy of cefazolin was tested in human patients undergoing urological operations. Concentrations in serum and homogenized skeletal muscle were determined by means of the agar well diffisuion method using a spore suspension of Bacillus subtilus ATCC 6633. Measurements in tissue homogenates were regarded as sufficient for evaluation of antimicrobial activity provided the right standard solution fluid and the amount of retained blood is considered. 2 g of cefazolin given in a short infusion of 25 min reached a peak concentration in muscle tissue of 20 ug/g. This concentration is high enough to inhibit nearly all strains of E.coli, Klebsiella, Salmonella, Shigella and the main part of Proteus mirabilis.

Cefazolin is known as cephalosporin C derivate with a wide range of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. As compared to cephalothin its activity against E.coli, Klebsiella and Salmonella is higher (Nishida et al, 1969; Naumann and Reintjens, 1974; Knothe, 1974; Hoffmann and Vömel, 1974). An elimination half-time of about 2 hours provides high serum levels and therefore allows longer dosage intervals (Naumann and Reintjens, 1974; Regamay et al, 1974). It is assumed that the high protein binding rate of 70-86% (Regamay et al, 1974; Naumann and Reintjens, 1974) leads to lower cefazolin levels in plasma water, the latter being considered the only effective fraction (Bergeron et a1,1973; Scholtan, 1968). But in order to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of cefazolin at the site of infection we tested its activity in human tissue.

Keywords

Tissue Concentration Proteus Mirabilis Urologic Operation Short Infusion Antimicrobial Efficacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Sinagowitz
    • 1
  • K. Pelz
    • 2
  • A. Burgert
    • 1
  • W. Kaczkowski
    • 1
  • H. Sommerkamp
    • 1
  • M. Westenfelder
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of UrologyUniversity of FreiburgW. Germany
  2. 2.Dept of MicrobiologyUniversity of FreiburgW. Germany

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