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Clean Energy Via Cryogenic Technology

  • L. O. Williams
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 18)

Abstract

Consideration of the total problem of air pollution leads to the conclusion that, for a permanent solution, the open-loop combustion of fossil fuel must eventually be stopped. Only nuclear power sources, particularly those using fusion, have the potential of producing the power required by the economy with a minimum of air pollution. Unfortunately, nuclear electric power generators cannot conveniently supply a great segment of the energy needs of the country, because of their lack of portability and the fact that they cannot be built extremely large and thus be economical because of the cost of transmitting electric power. For mobile (portable) requirements, a fuel combusted with air remains unexcelled as a power source. Examination of the chemical fuels that could be used for mobile power without producing air pollution lead to hydrogen as the only possible zero-pollution fuel. Hydrogen provides more energy per unit weight than any other fuel. It and its combustion products, hydrogen and water, are totally nontoxic.

Keywords

Fuel Cell Hydrocarbon Fuel Fuel Tank Liquid Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. O. Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Martin Marietta AerospaceDenverUSA

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