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A New Thermal Means for Gas Separation

  • W. E. Gifford
  • E. D. Veltri
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 18)

Abstract

In the last twenty years, there has been an immense improvement in the ability to build cryorefrigerators which achieve temperatures as low as 6.8 to 150 K in miniature size. This is true for a variety of refrigeration methods and cycles: the Stirling cycle, Gifford-McMahon cycle, Vuilleumier cycle, Solvay cycle, pulse tube refrigeration, and the free displacer refrigeration method [1–6].

Keywords

Thermal Regenerator Carbon Dioxide Level Flow Control Valve High Temperature Level Stirling Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    J. W. L. Köhler and C. O. Yonkers, Philips Tech. Rev., 69: 16 (1954).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. E. Gifford, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 11, Springer Science+Business Media New York (1966), p. 152.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    K. W. Cowans and P. J. Walsh, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 10, Springer Science+Business Media New York (1965), p. 468.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    F. N. Magee and R. D. Doering, “Vuilleumier Cycle Cryogenic Refrigerator Development,” Tech. Rept. AFFDL-TR-68–67, FDFE, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, August 1968.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    W. E. Gifford and R. C. Longsworth, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 11, Springer Science+Business Media New York (1966), p. 171.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    W. E. Gifford and E. M. Withjack, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 14, Springer Science+Business Media New York (1969), p. 361.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. E. Gifford
    • 1
  • E. D. Veltri
    • 2
  1. 1.Syracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA
  2. 2.General Electric CompanySchenectadyUSA

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