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Compressive Properties of Polyurethane and Polystyrene Foams from 76 to 300 K

  • J. M. Arvidson
  • R. L. Durcholz
  • R. P. Reed
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 18)

Abstract

For current foam applications in cryogenic environments compressive properties are more important than tensile properties. Most cryogenic uses require foams to serve as thermal insulators and to support, or partially support, compressive loads. However, one property, the ultimate strength, is not well defined for many foams. On application of a continuous compressive load some foams do not reach an ultimate compressive strength; instead, the rigid foams begin to “crumble,” allowing higher and higher loads to be sustained as the cell structure collapses. At room or dry-ice temperature flexible foams do not exhibit an ultimate compressive strength.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Ultimate Strength Polyurethane Foam Compressive Property Proportional Limit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    D. J. Doherty, R. Hurd, and G. R. Lester, Chemistry and Industry (London) (1962), p. 1340.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    F. J. Jelinek, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio, private communication (1971).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    R. P. Reed, J. M. Arvidson, and R. L. Durcholz, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, vol. 18, Springer Science+Business Media New York (1973), p. 184.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Arvidson
    • 1
  • R. L. Durcholz
    • 1
  • R. P. Reed
    • 1
  1. 1.Cryogenics DivisionNBS Institute for Basic StandardsBoulderUSA

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