Advertisement

Tensile Properties of Polyurethane and Polystyrene Foams from 76 to 300 K

  • R. P. Reed
  • J. M. Arvidson
  • R. L. Durcholz
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 18)

Abstract

Polyurethane and polystyrene foams are currently used in cryogenic applications as an insulating material. Since a large percentage of their volume is air (or whatever gas was used as the expanding agent in their manufacture) their thermal conductivity is very low. Increasingly, foam use in such applications requires load-carrying capacity. For efficient design in these cases mechanical property information is needed. Unfortunately, relatively few low-temperature mechanical property data have been generated [1–5].

Keywords

Ultimate Tensile Strength Polyurethane Foam Polystyrene Foam Foam Fracture Foam Specimen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R. P. Reed, R. L. Durcholz, and J. M. Arvidson, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 16, Springer Science+Business Media New York (1971), p. 37.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. M. McClintock, SPE J., 14: 36 (1958).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D. J. Doherty, R. Hurd, and G. R. Lester, Chemistry and Industry, (London) (1962), p. 1340.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    F. J. Jelinek, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio, private communication (1971).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    H. Kreft and D. Wagner, Kältetechnik-Klimatisierung, 9: 258 (1969).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    M. R. Patel and L. Finnie, “The Mechanical Properties of Foamed Materials,” UCRL Rept. No. 13193, Inst. Engr. Res., University of California, Berkeley, California (1965).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J. M. Arvidson, R. L. Durcholz, and R. P. Reed, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 18, Springer Science+Business Media New York (1973), p. 194.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    R. P. Reed and R. L. Durcholz, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 15, Springer Science+Business Media New York (1970), p. 109.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    F. E. Terman, Radio Engineer’s Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York (1943), p. 119.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. Reed
    • 1
  • J. M. Arvidson
    • 1
  • R. L. Durcholz
    • 1
  1. 1.Cryogenics DivisionNBS Institute for Basic StandardsBoulderUSA

Personalised recommendations