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Improved Ferric Oxide Gel Catalysts for Ortho-Parahydrogen Conversion

  • P. L. Barrick
  • L. F. Brown
  • H. L. Hutchinson
  • R. L. Cruse
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 10)

Abstract

The rapid increase in the production and applications of liquid hydrogen has focused renewed interest on the catalysts for the ortho-parahydrogen conversion. Although the hydrous ferric oxide catalyst developed by Weitzel and co-workers [1–4] has been used in several large liquid-hydrogen plants, the activity of the catalyst has been found to be extremely sensitive to the method of preparation, composition, and technique of activation. This paper reports the results of an investigation into these factors and shows how the activity of the ferric oxide gel catalyst may be doubled over that previously reported by improvements in the method of activation.

Keywords

Ferric Oxide Hydrogen Flow Rate Constant Temperature Bath Ferric Chloride Solution Good Heat Transfer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1965

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. L. Barrick
    • 1
  • L. F. Brown
    • 1
  • H. L. Hutchinson
    • 1
  • R. L. Cruse
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ColoradoBoulderUSA

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