Distillation of Hydrogen — Deuterium Mixtures

  • T. M. Flynn
  • D. H. Weitzel
  • K. D. Timmerhaus
  • P. C. Vander Arend
  • J. W. Draper
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 2)

Abstract

The recent increase in the demand for heavy water, or deuterium oxide, has stimulated an interest in the supply of deuterium. The natural abundance of deuterium in hydrogen is known to be 1 part in 6900, and three principal methods have been considered for the separation of deuterium from hydrogen: (1) catalytic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor, (2), distillation of water, and (3) distillation of liquid hydrogen.

Keywords

Eter Liner Deuterium Volatility Boulder 

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References

  1. 1.
    Washburn, Smith and Frandsen, J. Research, Nat. Bur. Stands., 11, 453 (1933).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Murphy, G. M., Urey, Harold C., and Kirshenbaum, I., Production of Heavy Water, McGraw-Hill, New York (1955).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Newman, R. B., Binary-Mixtures of H2, HD, and D2, Ph. D. thesis, University of Bristol (1954).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, Inc., New York 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. M. Flynn
    • 1
  • D. H. Weitzel
    • 1
  • K. D. Timmerhaus
    • 1
  • P. C. Vander Arend
    • 1
  • J. W. Draper
    • 1
  1. 1.CEL National Bureau of StandardsBoulderUSA

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