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Discriminative Properties of Narcotic Antagonists

  • Stephen G. Holtzman
  • Harlan E. Shannon
  • Gerald J. Schaefer
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 22)

Abstract

There have been many recent reports characterizing the discriminative properties of morphine and related narcotic analgesics in a variety of experimental paradigms, predominantly in the rat (see preceding chapter). It is becoming increasingly evident that a strong association exists between the discriminative properties of these drugs in animals and the qualitative nature of the subjective effects produced by these same drugs in man (Shannon and Holtzman, 1976a, b). Since the abuse potential of narcotic analgesics is largely a function of the nature of their subjective effects (see Fraser, 1968; Jasinski, 1973a), animal models for evaluating this component of drug action are of obvious importance on clinical as well as on theoretical grounds.

Keywords

Squirrel Monkey Subjective Effect Abuse Potential Narcotic Analgesic Training Dose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen G. Holtzman
    • 1
  • Harlan E. Shannon
    • 1
  • Gerald J. Schaefer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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