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Changes in Brain Catecholamines Induced by Long-Term Methamphetamine Administration in Rhesus Monkeys

  • Lewis S. Seiden
  • Marian W. Fischman
  • Charles R. Schuster
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 21)

Abstract

d-Amphetamine, methamphetamine and related psychomotor stimulants cause a decrease in food intake, increased locomotor activity and stereotypy, and disruption of behavior that is under schedule control. The dose required to produce different effects varies and depends on the nature of the behavior and the conditions under which the drug is administered. Repeated administration of amphetamine and related compounds leads to tolerance of many of its effects on behavior although the degree of tolerance depends on the frequency of administrations, the dose and the behavior examined.

Keywords

Tyrosine Hydroxylase Rhesus Monkey Corpus Striatum Pharmacological Research Increase Locomotor Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lewis S. Seiden
    • 1
  • Marian W. Fischman
    • 1
  • Charles R. Schuster
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacological and Physiological SciencesThe University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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