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Behavioral Correlates and Firing Repertoires of Neurons in Septal Nuclei in Unrestrained Rats

  • James B. RanckJr.
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 20)

Abstract

The behavioral correlates and firing repertoires of neurons in hippocampal formation have already been studied and published (32). In earlier work the basic strategy of the experimentation has been described, including many of its pitfalls. Briefly, the idea is to find the behavioral correlates of neurons in a fairly wide range of behavior. If one knows the behavioral correlates of all the neurons which are inputs and outputs of a region of brain, then one can determine the transformation of behavioral correlates that occurs in the region. This can be interpreted in terms of the information processing of the region. Some of the cellular mechanisms by which this processing may occur often follow as a simple interpretation from known anatomy and physiology.

Keywords

Slow Wave Hippocampal Formation Slow Wave Sleep Dorsal Part Theta Rhythm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • James B. RanckJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyThe University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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