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Insect Mechanoreceptor Mechanisms

  • M. J. Rice
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 15)

Abstract

The study of insect mechanoreceptors has a long history. The most obvious peripheral sense organs are of course the numerous cuticular hairs with which the bodies and appendages of most insects bristle; these were named sensilla by Haeckel who also decided that the associated peripheral sense cells are derived from the epidermis. Demoll, von Rath and others classified the numerous variety of sensilla and inferred their functions from general observations on the insects’ behaviour and on the structure and topography of the sensilla. By these means it was determined that setiform sensilla could monitor touch and indicate the flexion of joints; that campaniform sensilla could register bending of the cuticle; that the curiously modified setiform sensilla of Nepa served as static organs under water; that tympanal organs were auditory receptors and that chordo-tonal sensilla were responsive to movements and vibrations of the parts of the body (Historical Review by Wigglesworth, 1973). Other sensory cells associated with flexible joints and flexible areas of the body wall were described by Retzius (1890) and Zarwarzin (1912). These were thought to be involved in general mechanical and possibly thermal senses (Snodgrass, 1926).

Keywords

Sensory Cell Neurosecretory Cell Golgi Tendon Organ Basal Bulb Auditory Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Rice
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyUniversity of QueenslandQueenslandAustralia

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