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Transmethylation Processes in Schizophrenia

  • F. Antun
  • D. Eccleston
  • J. R. Smythies
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 1)

Abstract

It is generally agreed today that the etiology of schizophrenia is compounded of a genetically determined predisposition, in the form of some vulnerable enzyme system or systems in the brain possibly concerned with reactions to stress, together with various environmental factors that determine whether the genotype is actually expressed as the phenotype. There is very little information, however, on what the biochemical lesion is, and only a handful of hypotheses about what the lesion could be. The so-called transmethylation hypothesis is based on the observation made in 1950 by Harley-Mason, Osmond, and Smythies that mescaline is an O-methyl derivative of dopamine. Many other psychotomimetic drugs have been discovered since then, and most of these are either O-methyl, or N-methyl (or both) derivatives of the central neurotransmitters, noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin.

Keywords

Schizophrenic Patient Anion Exchange Resin Blow Down Isobutyl Methyl Ketone Brain Serotonin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Antun
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Eccleston
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. R. Smythies
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghScotland
  2. 2.Brain Metabolism UnitMedical Research CouncilEdinburghScotland

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