Earthworm Coelomocyte Immunity

  • Russell K. Hostetter
  • Edwin L. Cooper

Abstract

The coelomic cavity of Lumbricus terrestris may be considered a hypothetical precursor of the vertebrate immune system. It is in contact with all organs, allowing communication with the coelomic fluid, and with coelomic cells, obviating a specialized lymphatic vascular system. The coelom is equipped with septa positioned perpendicularly to the flow of coelomic fluid, forming an efficient filtering organ, which together with the coelomic epithelial lining may be analogous to the vertebrate reticuloendothelial system. Earthworm coelomo- cytes respond to pathogenic organisms and effect tissue graft rejection, both reactions are characteristics of vertebrate lymphoid cells.

Keywords

Migration Germinal Hematoxylin Eosin Encapsulation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell K. Hostetter
    • 1
  • Edwin L. Cooper
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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