Recognition of Foreignness in the Fresh-Water Crayfish, Parachaeraps bicarinatus

  • C. J. Tyson
  • D. McKay
  • C. R. Jenkin

Abstract

In the vertebrates, recognition of foreignness by phagocytic cells is mediated by interaction of specific immunoglobulins with foreign material. As a result of this interaction, the foreign material—antibody complex adheres to the membranes of phagocytic cells and is engulfed. These specific recognition factors (immunoglobulins) may be present in the serum or adsorbed to the surface of the cell. The number of molecules of immunoglobulin required per foreign particle to bring about this recognition varies according to the immunoglobulin class and the size of the particle. However, the recognition of bacteria by peritoneal macrophages from the mouse requires only a few hundred molecules of antibody per bacterial cell (Rowley and Turner, 1966; Jackson et al., 1968).

Keywords

Cysteine Heparin Syringe Trypsin Hydrochloride 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. J. Tyson
    • 1
  • D. McKay
    • 1
  • C. R. Jenkin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideSouth Australia

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