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Application of Marrow Grafts in Human Disease: Its Problems and Potential

  • George W. Santos

Abstract

The present chapter is not intended as an exhaustive review of marrow transplantation but is rather a somewhat personal view distilled from more than 15 years of laboratory and clinical work. In the following pages, the rationale for, problems associated with, and current results of clinical marrow transplantation for bone marrow failure, organ grafting, and malignancy will be outlined.

Keywords

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Marrow Transplantation Spleen Cell Aplastic Anemia Marrow Graft 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • George W. Santos
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Oncology Department of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins University and Oncology Service Baltimore City HospitalsBaltimoreUSA

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