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A Developmental Approach to the Biological Basis for Antibody Diversity

  • Max D. Cooper
  • Alexander R. Lawton
  • Paul W. Kincade

Abstract

The emphasis in this discussion will be on early events in differentiation of antibody-producing cells, an area of immunology that is in its experimental infancy. Most of the available information on the antibody problem emerged from analyses of relatively mature cells of the plasma cell lineage and the end products they secrete. Several useful theories on the development of antibody heterogeneity taking into account the diversity and specificity of antibody molecules, the restrictions imposed by genetic and structural analyses, and the phenomenon of self-recognition have been proposed. However, the paucity of knowledge of the origin, identity, and characterization of pre-antibody forming cells has been a handicap in the struggle toward a final solution of this problem.

Keywords

Medullary Cell Plasma Cell Differentiation Antibody Diversity Peripheral Lymphoid Tissue Single Stem Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Max D. Cooper
    • 1
  • Alexander R. Lawton
    • 1
  • Paul W. Kincade
    • 1
  1. 1.Spain Research Laboratories Departments of Pediatrics and MicrobiologyUniversity of Alabama Medical CenterBirminghamUSA

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