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Barley (Hordeum vulgare)

  • Robert A. Nilan

Abstract

Cultivated barley, Hordeum vulgare L., is one of the leading experimental organisms in genetic studies of flowering plants. The wide use of this important agricultural crop plant in genetic studies may be attributed to its diploid nature, low chromosome number (2n = 14), world-wide distribution, high degree of self-fertility, ease of hybridization, relatively large chromosomes which allow detection of several kinds of chromosome aberrations, and numerous easily classified hereditary characters. Many of these characters have occurred as mutants after physical- or chemical-mutagen treatments. Since barley is one of the chief models among higher plants for induced-mutation studies, new characters are being added at a considerable rate.

Keywords

Hordeum Vulgare Spot Blotch Loose Smut Zebra Stripe Primary Trisomic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert A. Nilan
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Program in GeneticsWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  2. 2.Department of Agronomy and SoilsWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA

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