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The Whistle Repertoire of the North Atlantic Pilot Whale (Globicephala melaena) and Its Relationship to Behavior and Environment

  • Algis G. Taruski

Abstract

Very little is known about the normal sounds and behavior of the North Atlantic pilot whale, Globicephala melaena, or of other pilot whales. Schevill (1964) stated that the whistles of Globicephala melaena range from 0.5 to 5.0 kHz in sound frequency, while those of G. macrorhynchus range from 2 to 12 kHz. Busnel et al. (1971) described double clicks produced by Globicephala. Busnel and Dziedzic (1966) presented a detailed report on a single hour-long encounter with a school of 11 pilot whales. During the encounter one animal was harpooned. The authors described and figured five signal types and several variants. In addition, they noted abrupt frequency shifts and amplitude variations.

Keywords

Calling Rate Herd Size Arousal State Behavior Category Large Herd 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Algis G. Taruski
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of OceanographyUniversity of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA

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