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Hippocampal Electrical Activity and Behavior

  • A. H. Black

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the relationship between the electroencephalographic activity (EEG) of the hippocampus and behavior. Its objectives are twofold. The first is to provide information on the structure and functions of the hippocampus—particularly on its behavioral functions. The second is to describe some behavioral research procedures which are, I think, more analytically powerful than many procedures that have been employed in the past for studying the relationship between brain electrical activity and behavior.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Physiological Psychology Passive Avoidance Hippocampal Lesion Behavioral Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. H. Black
    • 1
  1. 1.McMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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