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The Problem of the Amnesic Syndrome in Man and Animals

  • L. Weiskrantz
  • Elizabeth K. Warrington

Abstract

It is generally agreed that damage to the bilateral medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, in man produces a severe and enduring anterograde amnesic syndrome. Leaving aside the important question of comparability of lesions in different studies, one may nevertheless ask why this most distinctive and debilitating of human memory disorders has not been found or produced in animals with hippocampal lesions. There can be only one or a combination of three possibilities: either the description of the defect in man is incomplete or inadequate, or the appropriate methods of analysis have not yet been discovered for the animal, or man and other primates are fundamentally different in the expression of brain function even though neuroanatomically the relevant regions of the brain are so very similar. This chapter will concentrate mainly on the first possibility and, by attempting then to identify points of contact between human and animal research, may show the third possibility to be less likely.

Keywords

Recognition Memory Retention Testing Proactive Interference Reversal Learning Hippocampal Lesion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Weiskrantz
    • 1
  • Elizabeth K. Warrington
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Experimental PsychologyUniversity of OxfordOxfordEngland
  2. 2.The National HospitalLondonEngland

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