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Clinical Aspects of Elapid Bite

  • André de Vries
  • Eleanor Condrea

Abstract

Although the elapid family comprises numerous species, the rationale of dealing with the clinical aspects of their bites jointly is their having in common neurotoxic symptomatology as the preponderant feature. In this characteristic they differ from the Viperidae and the Crotalidae whose bites mainly produce blood clotting disturbances, hemorrhage, and necrosis. Indeed, the clinical picture following snake bite often may serve indirectly to identify the responsible snake and determine treatment accordingly. On the other hand, these clinical disturbances are not absolute since necrosis may be produced by elapid bite, as for instance in the case of the Malayan cobra (Reid, 1964). Therefore, knowledge of both the species locally prevalent and the characteristic symptoms produced by their bite is imperative.

Keywords

Snake Venom Venom Gland Snake Bite Cobra Venom Venomous Animal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • André de Vries
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eleanor Condrea
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine and BiochemistryTel-Aviv University Medical SchoolUSA
  2. 2.Rogoff-Wellcome Medical Research InstituteBeilinson HospitalPetah TikvaIsrael

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