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Photoelectric Image Intensifiers

  • J. D. McGee
Part of the Optical Physics and Engineering book series (OPEG)

Abstract

The basic reason for the development of photoelectronic devices is the fact that the photoelectric effect has a much higher quantum efficiency than the photographic effect. Thus, the probability that a photon will liberate a photoelectron is, under favorable conditions, as high as 0.3, whereas the probability that a similar photon will activate a grain of silver halide in a photographic emulsion to a state where it can be developed is about 0.003. This ratio, at the wavelength of blue light, 4000–4500 Å, is about 100:1. This is illustrated in the curves of Fig. 1, showing the quantum efficiency curves for several photocathodes compared with that for Eastman Kodak IIα-0 emulsion. This ratio tends to be even greater at other wavelengths when we compare the most suitable photocathode with the most efficient photographic emulsion for that wavelength.

Keywords

Primary Electron Image Intensifier Electron Physics Silver Halide Phosphor Screen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. McGee
    • 1
  1. 1.Imperial College of Science and TechnologyLondonEngland

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