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The Plumbicon®

  • E. H. Stupp
  • R. S. Levitt
Part of the Optical Physics and Engineering book series (OPEG)

Abstract

The Plumbicon is a camera tube of the vidicon type which utilizes a layer of lead oxide (PbO) for the photosensitive target instead of the more usual photoconducting layer of Sb2S3 employed in standard vidicons. Section I first considers the physical properties of lead oxide as applied to camera tubes and then discusses how these characteristics give the Plumbicon its unique features. Section II describes in detail the operating and performance characteristics of typical commercial Plumbicons, and compares these to those of a modern photoconductive vidicon.

Keywords

Dark Current Signal Current Modulation Depth Lead Oxide Target Voltage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

A. Lead Oxide Layers

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. H. Stupp
    • 1
  • R. S. Levitt
    • 2
  1. 1.Philips LaboratoriesBriarcliff ManorUSA
  2. 2.Electro-optical Devices DivisionAmperex Electronic Corp.SlatersvilleUSA

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