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New Particle Spectroscopy and Decays

  • Frederick J. Gilman
Part of the Studies in the Natural Sciences book series (SNS, volume 11)

Abstract

In the year since the last meeting in this series, great progress has been made in the spectroscopy of the new particles and their decays. Much of this progress is either directly the result of experiment or at least has been very much stimulated by the astonishing results presented to us one after another by our experimental colleagues. In one way, what has happened is exemplified by the contrast between what was known about the 4-GeV region in e+e → hadrons a year ago1 (Figure 1) and data2 which were shown this morning (Figure 2).

Keywords

Hadronic Decay Charged Multiplicity Heavy Lepton Direct Decay Final State Hadron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick J. Gilman
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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