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Feeding Behavior of Lemur Catta in Different Habitats

  • Norman Budnitz
Part of the Perspectives in Ethology book series (PEIE, volume 3)

Abstract

Biologists have been trying to explain observed differences in the social structure of different species by looking at the environmental constraints on those species. For example, Crook and Gartlan (1966) observed that in open habitats (e.g., the African savanna), primate species tend to be organized into groups with large home ranges, while in more closed habitats (e.g., forests), other primate species are organized into smaller groups with smaller home ranges. On the basis of these and other observations, the authors concluded that habitats place particular constraints on social structure and that animals respond in ways that biologists should be able to predict.

Keywords

Home Range Feeding Behavior Open Canopy Gallery Forest Vervet Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Budnitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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