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The Corpus Luteum Studied In Vitro

  • Cornelia P. Channing
  • Florence Ledwitz-Rigby
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 4)

Abstract

In spite of the fact that the existence of the corpus luteum has been known for almost four centuries, relatively little is known about the basic mechanism controlling its formation, function, and regression. The current status of knowledge of the corpus luteum has been reviewed in a 1973 symposium volume of Biology of Reproduction as well as in the present volumes and by Nalbandov (1973). The formation of the corpus luteum from granulosa and thecal cells appears to have a similar mechanism in most mammalian species; however, the control of its life span varies from species to species. Part of this complex nature of control of luteal life span is due to fact that there are both intrinsic mechanisms within the gland and extragonadal factors such as a possible uterine luteolysin (for review, see Anderson, 1973), prostaglandins, and hormones which can shorten or prolong luteal life span. The problem addressed in this chapter is what are the intrinsic factors which control the formation and functional life span of the corpus luteum; particular reference will be made to the primate and the pig. Once the intrinsic mechanisms are understood, a proper basis will exist for examining and understanding the action of extragonadal influences. By necessity, an in vitro method of study of these intrinsic mechanisms must be employed, without the complicating variables encountered in the in vivo situation.

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Granulosa Cell Corpus Luteum Follicular Fluid Luteinizing Hormone Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornelia P. Channing
    • 1
  • Florence Ledwitz-Rigby
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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