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Improving Protein Content and Quality in Legumes

  • D. Boulter
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 8)

Abstract

Methods suitable for screening protein content in legumes are identified, including dye-binding, infrared (IR) reflectance, air-gap electrode, and micro-Kjeldahl with automatic nitrogen determination. Consideration is given to protein quality, because a smaller content of high-quality protein may be a more desirable breeding objective than a larger amount of less nutritious protein. Chemical assay and rat-feeding trials of seed meals of Vigna unguiculata and Phaseolus vulgaris lead to the conclusion that it is necessary to monitor both the sulfo-amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Total sulfur is suggested as a suitable measure of these after prior removal of sulfur-containing soluble components, such as S-methyl-L-cysteine. The importance of considering legume protein modification in relationship to diet and not in isolation is emphasized. Legume seeds contain many different proteins which for present purposes may be classified into (1) those which are of interest insofar as they can be manipulated to increase protein content or quality in seed meals; (2) those which are antimetabolites; and (3) those which may afford protection against pests or diseases. This classification is discussed subsequently. The special position of storage protein in relationship to nutritional improvement is stressed in terms of the process of protein biosynthesis in seeds.

Keywords

Amino Acid Composition Storage Protein Trypsin Inhibitor Seed Meal Vigna Unguiculata 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Boulter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of DurhamDurhamEngland

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