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Population Trends and Policies in Latin America

  • Araica A. Hildebrando
  • Eduardo E. Arriaga
  • Carlos Tejada
  • Dale D. Harpstead
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 7)

Abstract

The countries that constitute Latin America* have undergone a series of changes of varying character and intensity since World War II. Convulsions of social and economic origin have seen the birth of the first Socialist state, and have been linked to many violent changes in political power that have put social institutions to very hard tests. A state of economic dependency tends to intensify multiple social problems, particularly those related to food supplies and consumption, and has determined changes in social and political attitudes that have led to new approaches, strategies, and programs for solving food problems. Cooperative international action has played an important role as both promoter and coordinator. The Economic Commission for Latin America (ECLA) has assumed the task of creating a social conscience in our hemisphere regarding the origin and character of the main economic difficulties to be faced. The analyses and projections of economic and social development were the first significant steps taken by our countries. This fundamental action was followed by joint efforts toward import substitution, development planning, industrialization, promotion of economic integration through common markets, and studies of income distribution. As Prebisch pointed out in 1970 (1), this joint effort has taken place within the context of direct foreign investments that strongly influence indigenous economic development. These investments constitute a material expression of the dependency mentioned earlier, and have tended to delay national technologic development. They have also absorbed national enterprises that were relatively advanced technologically because of local difficulties in obtaining credit, or because foreign executives are more interested in monetary returns than they are in encouraging our economic development, leading to strangulation from without, because of debt payments to foreign investors.

Keywords

Direct Foreign Investment Latin American Country Family Planning Program Population Policy Demographic Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Araica A. Hildebrando
    • 1
  • Eduardo E. Arriaga
    • 2
  • Carlos Tejada
    • 3
  • Dale D. Harpstead
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Population and PlanningMinistry of HealthPanamaPanama
  2. 2.Data Evaluation Branch, International Statistical Programs CenterU.S. Bureau of the CensusUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Nutrition of Central America and PanamaGuatemala CityGuatemala
  4. 4.Department of Crop and Soil SciencesMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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