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Polyethylene-Nylon 6 Graft Copolymers I. Mechanical Properties and Permeability Characteristics of Copolymers Prepared by Anionic and and Cationic Initiated Processes

  • M. Matzner
  • D. L. Schober
  • R. N. Johnson
  • L. M. Robeson
  • J. E. McGrath
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (PST, volume 6)

Abstract

A graft copolymer of polyethylene and nylon 6 combines two materials each of which possesses good properties. As is well known, polyethylene is a tough flexible polymer which is insensitive to moisture. Oxygen permeability is intermediate and its crystalline melting point (Tm) is relatively low. Nylon 6, on the other hand, has very low oxygen permeability (dry) coupled with a high Tm of 218°C. However, nylon 6 displays strong sensitivity to moisture. Therefore its utility is significantly impaired under conditions of high humidity.

Keywords

Graft Copolymer Ring Opening Polymerization Anionic Polymerization Ethyl Acrylate Acid Copolymer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Matzner
    • 1
  • D. L. Schober
    • 1
  • R. N. Johnson
    • 1
  • L. M. Robeson
    • 1
  • J. E. McGrath
    • 1
  1. 1.Research and Development DepartmentUnion Carbide Chemicals and PlasticsBound BrookUSA

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