Advertisement

Preparation and Application of Radiation-Grafted Hydrogels as Biomaterials

  • A. S. Hoffman
  • G. Schmer
  • T. A. Horbett
  • B. D. Ratner
  • L. N. Teng
  • C. Harris
  • W. G. Kraft
  • B. N. L. Khaw
  • T. T. Ling
  • T. P. Mate
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (PST, volume 6)

Abstract

Hydrogels refer to a class of water swollen, lightly cross-linked polymeric gels which have been mentioned often as useful biomaterials (e.g., 1,2). Although they may be used in bulk forms, as in the soft contact lens, there are many applications where the mechanical demands are too great for typical hydrogels, and then such materials are best used as coatings on stronger supports. Although some polymeric supports are readily coated by solution dip coating techniques (3), there are many polymers of biomedical interest which are not so easily coated. The technique of radiation grafting (e.g., 4) is especially suitable for depositing coatings of a wide variety of hydrophilic polymer compositions and thicknesses onto and within almost any shape or composition of support polymer (e.g., 5–14). Over the past three years* our group has been applying this method, using cobalt-60 radiation, to produce directly or precursors of a whole family of new biomaterials (6–8, 10–12). This paper describes some of the highlights of our studies; most details of materials and procedures may be found in these references.

Keywords

Caproic Acid Polymeric Support Monomer Mixture Mechanical Demand Additional Process Step 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Levowitz, B.S. et al., Trans. Amer. Soc. Artif. Internal Organs, 14, 82 (1968).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bruck, S., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 7, 337 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tollar, M., Stol, M. and Kliment, K., J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 3, 305 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    a) Chapiro, A. “Radiation Chemistry of Polymeric Systems,” Interscience, N. Y. (1962).Google Scholar
  5. b) Stannett, V. and Hoffman, A.S., Amer. Dyestuff Reporter, 57, 25, 91 (1968).Google Scholar
  6. 5.
    Yasuda, H. and Refojo, M.F., J. Polymer Sci., 2, 5093 (1964).Google Scholar
  7. 6.
    Hoffman, A.S., Schmer, G., Harris C., and Kraft, W.G., Trans. Amer. Soc. Artif. Internal Organs, 18, 1 ) (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 7.
    Hoffman, A.S. and Kraft, W.G., Polymer Preprints (ACS), 13, 2, 723 (1972).Google Scholar
  9. 8.
    Hoffman, A.S. and Harris, C., Polymer Preprints (ACS), 13, 2, 740 (1972).Google Scholar
  10. 9.
    Lee, H.B., Shim, H.S. and Andrade, J.D., Polymer Preprints (ACS), 13, 2, 729 (1972).Google Scholar
  11. 10.
    Khaw, B.N.L., M.S. Thesis in Chem. Eng., University of Washington, June 1972.Google Scholar
  12. 11.
    Ling, T.T., M.S. Thesis in Chem. Eng., University of Washington, June 1972.Google Scholar
  13. 12.
    Ratner, B.D. and Hoffman, A.S., Org. Coatings and Plastics Chem. Preprints (ACS), 33, 2, 286 (1973).Google Scholar
  14. 13.
    Laizier, J. and Wajs, G. in “Large Radiat:on Sources for Industrial Processes”, I.A.E.A., Vienna 0. 969 ), pp. 205Google Scholar
  15. 14.
    Kearney, J.J., Amara, I. and McDevitt, M.E., Org. Coatings and Plastics Chem. Preprints (ACS), 33, 3, 34E (1973).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. S. Hoffman
    • 1
  • G. Schmer
    • 1
  • T. A. Horbett
    • 1
  • B. D. Ratner
    • 1
  • L. N. Teng
    • 1
  • C. Harris
    • 1
  • W. G. Kraft
    • 1
  • B. N. L. Khaw
    • 1
  • T. T. Ling
    • 1
  • T. P. Mate
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Center for BioengineeringUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

Personalised recommendations