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Thin-Film Composite Membrane Performance in a Spiral-Wound Single-Stage Reverse Osmosis Seawater Pilot Plant

  • R. L. Riley
  • G. R. Hightower
  • C. R. Lyons
  • M. Tagami
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (PST, volume 6)

Abstract

Desalination of seawater by reverse osmosis requires a membrane that approaches theoretical semipermeability and is sufficiently thin to provide a rapid transport of water at practical pressures. To be economical, the process must operate in a single stage at a water recovery of 30% and greater. Thus, the membrane must reject about 99.5% of the sodium chloride to produce potable water. Regardless of composition, membranes of this type must essentially be free of imperfections.

Keywords

Reverse Osmosis Composite Membrane Desalinate Water Support Membrane Cellulose Triacetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Riley
    • 1
  • G. R. Hightower
    • 1
  • C. R. Lyons
    • 1
  • M. Tagami
    • 1
  1. 1.ROGA DivisionUniversal Oil ProductsSan DiegoUSA

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