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Principles of Pesticide Degradation in Soil

  • C. A. I. Goring
  • D. A. Laskowski
  • J. W. Hamaker
  • R. W. Meikle
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 6)

Abstract

History will record that eventually there was a relatively simple accommodation to the extraordinarily complex problem of defining and using principles of degradation to predict this aspect of the behavior of pesticides in soil. So it is with many scientific endeavors.

Keywords

Soil Organic Matter Humic Substance Humic Acid Methyl Parathion Methyl Bromide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. I. Goring
    • 1
  • D. A. Laskowski
    • 1
  • J. W. Hamaker
    • 2
  • R. W. Meikle
    • 2
  1. 1.Ag-Organics DepartmentDow Chemical CompanyMidlandUSA
  2. 2.Ag-Organics DepartmentDow Chemical CompanyWalnut CreekUSA

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