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Partitioning and Uptake of Pesticides in Biological Systems

  • Eugene E. Kenaga
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 6)

Abstract

Biological systems can be interpreted to mean the mixture of things which are necessary for life, whether inside or outside of a single organism or community of organisms. Some of the major necessities for life include water, oxygen, organic food, minerals, energy generated by the sun, flow systems, and a media to live in. All chemicals making up such necessities exist in gas, liquid, and solid phases in various ratios which are temperature, pressure, and solubility dependent.

Keywords

Soil Organic Matter Humic Acid Partition Coefficient Bioconcentration Factor Water Partition Coefficient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene E. Kenaga
    • 1
  1. 1.Health and Environmental Research DepartmentThe Dow Chemical CompanyMidlandUSA

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