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Estimation of Soil Parathion Residues in the San Joaquin Valley, California — a Simulation Study

  • Dennis P. H. Hsieh
  • Haji M. Jameel
  • Raymond A. Fleck
  • Wendell W. Kilgore
  • Ming Y. Li
  • Ruth R. Painter
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 6)

Abstract

Despite the great concern over environmental contamination by pesticides, man continues to depend on the use of pest-control chemicals for agricultural productivity and disease control. Phasing out of DDT has resulted in a considerable increase in the use of organophosphorous insecticides, particularly parathion, a chemical highly toxic for both invertebrates and vertebrates including man. In 1970, 1.2 million lbs of parathion were used in California, placing this compound among the top chemical pesticides in quantity used, and ahead of any other organophosphorous insecticide.

Keywords

Residue Level Pesticide Chemical Degradation Rate Constant Organophosphorous Insecticide Average Residue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis P. H. Hsieh
    • 1
  • Haji M. Jameel
    • 1
  • Raymond A. Fleck
    • 1
  • Wendell W. Kilgore
    • 1
  • Ming Y. Li
    • 1
  • Ruth R. Painter
    • 1
  1. 1.Food Protection and Toxicology CenterUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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