The Effect of Carbon Monoxide on Time Perception, Manual Coordination, Inspection, and Arithmetic

  • Richard D. Stewart
  • Paul E. Newton
  • Michael J. Hosko
  • Jack E. Peterson
  • James W. Mellender
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 5)

Abstract

The first untoward effect of carbon monoxide (CO) upon healthy man is reported to be a gross impairment in his ability to distinguish between short intervals of time and to estimate 30-sec intervals (Beard and Wertheim, 1967). Alarmingly, these decrements in time perception are reported to be produced by exposures to CO at concentrations as low as 50 parts per million (ppm) for 90 min, exposures which are currently acceptable in American industry (ACGIH, 1972), commonly encountered by urban populations, and much lower than those experienced by the average adult smoking one pack of cigarettes per day (Surgeon General, 1972).

Keywords

Toxicity Helium Polyethylene Hydrocarbon Carbon Monoxide 

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Copyright information

© University of Rochester 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard D. Stewart
    • 1
  • Paul E. Newton
    • 1
  • Michael J. Hosko
    • 1
  • Jack E. Peterson
    • 1
  • James W. Mellender
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental MedicineThe Medical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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