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Effects of Drugs on Schedule-Controlled Behavior and Cardiovascular Function in the Squirrel Monkey

  • R. T. Kelleher
  • W. H. Morse
  • J. A. Herd
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 5)

Abstract

Environmental circumstances can modulate physiological functions and alter the action of drugs. There is now much systematic information on how the behavioral effects of drugs are modified by environmental determinants of behavior. Most drugs have selective actions on behavior in different situations, and predictions about the behavioral effects of a drug require knowledge about the conditions under which the drug is acting and the determinants of behavior in that situation. In some instances the profound effects of environmental factors in modifying the actions of drugs apply to the toxic effects of drugs; for example, it is now well known that changing the environmental circumstances can markedly enhance the lethality of amphetamine (Chance, 1946, 1967; Gunn and Gurd, 1940; Höhn and Lasagna, 1960; Weiss et al., 1961.)

Keywords

Arterial Blood Pressure Electric Shock Squirrel Monkey Multiple Schedule Food Presentation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© University of Rochester 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. T. Kelleher
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. H. Morse
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. A. Herd
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry, Physiology, and PharmacologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.New England Regional Primate Research CenterSouthboroughUSA

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