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Action of Mutagenic Agents

  • H. V. Malling
  • J. S. Wassom

Abstract

The biochemical processes which ensure the stability of genetic material transmitted from one generation to another are complex. A delicate balance exists between the fidelity and stability of this material which enables organisms to proliferate in their environment. Unfortunately, widespread use has been made of both man-made and naturally occurring chemical formulations which can interfere with these genetic processes. There is growing concern that these agents may be significantly contributing to the health burden of man by increasing the frequency of genetic diseases.

Keywords

Chromosome Aberration Mutagenic Agent Chemical Mutagenesis Maleic Hydrazide Alkylation Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. V. Malling
    • 1
  • J. S. Wassom
    • 2
  1. 1.Biochemical Genetics Section, Environmental Mutagenesis BranchNational Institute of Environmental Health SciencesResearch Triangle ParkUSA
  2. 2.Information Center Complex/Information Division, Oak Ridge National LaboratoryEnvironmental Mutagen Information CenterOak RidgeUSA

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