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Use of PGE(1) in Preparation and Storage of Platelet Concentrates

  • G. A. Becker
  • M. K. Chalos
  • M. Tuccelli
  • R. H. Aster
Part of the Alza Conference Series book series (AEMB, volume 195B)

Abstract

With increasing awareness by physicians of the usefulness of platelets in treating hemorrhage due to thrombocytopenia, the demand for platelet concentrates has steadily increased. More intensive use of chemotherapy, radiation, and immunosuppressive therapy in modern medicine and the recognition that bleeding may be due to qualitative as well as quantitative platelet abnormalities make it almost certain that the demand for platelets will increase still further. Yet, except within a few institutions, platelets are often in short supply because of their limited permissible storage time and the high cost in time and materials necessary for preparation of a therapeutic quantity of platelets. The finding that platelets can be stored for several days with only minimal loss of viability if kept at room temperature rather than in the cold as was previously recommended, has helped to increase the quantities of platelets available for transfusion (Murphy and Gardner, 1969; Murphy et al, 1970).

Keywords

Bleeding Time Platelet Concentrate Manual Manipulation Prolonged Bleeding Time Thrombocytopenic Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. Becker
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. K. Chalos
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Tuccelli
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. H. Aster
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Milwaukee Blood centerUSA
  2. 2.Medical College of WisconsinUSA

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