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Communication and Aggression in a Group of Young Chimpanzees

  • E. W. MenzelJr.
Part of the Advances in the Study of Communication and Affect book series (ASCA, volume 2)

Abstract

Descriptions of a social event may proceed in either of two basically different ways: We may attend to the physical parameters of the event, or we may attend to the meaning or functional significance of the event for an observer. The term “aggression” is a clear example of the latter type of description. It is a judgment which has an imperfect and only partially known correspondence to the spatio-temporal “facts” of physical science. Furthermore, the functional significance of the same event might be judged very differently by different observers. Even a panel of physicists does not always agree on how to describe an event. But it would be even more foolhardy to hope for perfect agreement between the judgments of (a) the initiator of an attack, invasion, intrusion, provocation, or fight; (b) the recipient of that act; (c) a judge from the same social community; (d) a panel of judges from other societies of the same species; and (e) the behavioral scientist who tries to describe aggressive events as if he were a total outsider watching creatures from a different planet. In many cases, even a judge cannot easily decide who was the initiator or what were the hostilities.

Keywords

Test Person Goal Object Group Dispersion Friendly Person Dominant Animal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. W. MenzelJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.State University of New YorkStony BrookUSA

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