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Historical Survey of Studies of the Optical Properties of Ions in Solids

  • Ferd Williams
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSB, volume 8)

Abstract

The history of scholarly work on ions in solids, with particular emphasis on optical properties, is reviewed from the very earliest work until the present. Early empirical studies are first discussed; then the basic quantum mechanical interpretations, including the adiabatic and Hartree-Fock approximations, are presented; crystal field theory and ligand field theory are discussed and applied to transition metal and rare earth ions; resonance energy transfer between ions is noted; and finally ion pairs and multiphoton transitions are reviewed. The principal emphasis is on radiative transitions between electronic states, both optical absorption and luminescent emission, with attention both to the evolution of concepts and to recent experimental methods.

Keywords

Crystal Field Resonance Energy Transfer Luminescent Emission Crystal Field Parameter Gallium Phosphide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ferd Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA

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