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Effect of Prostaglandins on Gastrointestinal Functions

  • André Robert
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 13)

Abstract

Several prostaglandins (PG) of the E and A types were found to affect several functions of the gastrointestinal tract, and to exert therapeutic effect on a variety of lesions of the stomach, the duodenum and the small intestine in animals. They have already been used successfully on a limited basis, in patients with peptic ulcer. PG are known to be produced within the gastrointestinal tract, and, because of their very short half life, are believed to exert their activity primarily where they are produced (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8). The reader is referred to reviews that have been published on the various effects of PG on the gastrointestinal tract (9,10,11,12,13). We will discuss certain properties of PG related to gastric secretion, ulcer formation, diarrhea, and a property discovered recently called “cytoprotection.”

Keywords

Gastric Mucosa Duodenal Ulcer Gastric Acid Secretion Gastric Secretion Gastrointestinal Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • André Robert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Experimental BiologyThe Upjohn CompanyKalamazooUSA

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