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Chemistry of Prostaglandins and Thromboxanes

  • Elisabeth Granström
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 13)

Abstract

The structures of several prostaglandins were determined during the early 1960’s. First, two biologically active compounds were isolated from sheep vesicular glands; these compounds were called PGE1 and PGF (for a review, see Ref. 1). Reduction of PGE1 with sodium borohydride gave a mixture of two epimeric compounds, PGF and PGF. Further studies on the structures of these compounds revealed that they were derivatives of a C20 carboxylic acid, later named prostatic acid, which contained a five-membered ring (C-8 to C-12) with two side chanis. Prostaglandins of the E type were shown to have a keto group at C-9, whereas a hydroxyl group was found in this position in the F prostaglandins. The index α or β indicates the stereochemical position of this hydroxyl group. Common to all these prostaglandins and most others is the presence of an L-hydroxyl group at C-15 and a Δ13-trans double bond.

Keywords

Arachidonic Acid Sodium Borohydride Stannous Chloride Keto Group Eicosatetraenoic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elisabeth Granström
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of ChemistryKarolinska InstitutetStockholm 60Sweden

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