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Mode of Synthesis of Ribosomal RNA in Various Plant Organisms

  • G. Richter
  • R. Misske
  • R. Stempka
  • W. Dirks
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 12)

Abstract

In a number of eukaryotes the pathway of synthesis of ribosomal RNA has been extensively studied and well documented; The two species are transcribed in the nucleolus as components of a single large precursor molecule from which they are released through a succession of intermediates. This holds true for certain animal cells and yeast, In other eukaryotes, especially in higher and lower plants, details of rRNA synthesis are less well understood. A major difficulty con-sists in the diversity of high molecular RNA molecules mainly observed in those plant cells which dispose of additional systems of rRNA synthesis, i.e. in chloroplasts as well as in mitochondria. One approach to this problem is provided by the selection of a plant organism with features suitable for the preferential investigation of one of these various pathways of rRNA synthesis. The present communication considers details of rRNA synthesis in the nucleolus, in chloroplasts and in mitochondria of eukaryotic plant cells.

Keywords

Orotic Acid rRNA Synthesis Radioactivity Peak rRNA Species Green Alga Chlorella Pyrenoidosa 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Richter
    • 1
  • R. Misske
    • 1
  • R. Stempka
    • 1
  • W. Dirks
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für BotanikTechnische UniversitätHannover 21Germany

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