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Nucleotide Sequences of Plant Viral RNAs

  • J. P. Briand
  • C. Fritsch
  • H. Guilley
  • G. Jonard
  • C. Klein
  • D. Lamy
  • K. Richards
  • L. Hirth
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 12)

Abstract

The genome of plant viruses is either carried by large RNA molecules containing the whole genetic information (tobacco mosaic virus for example) or by several pieces of nucleic acid each containing a part of the total genetic information (alfalfa mosaic virus, brome mosaic virus). But whatever the type of virus the shortest RNA piece it contains is on the order of 1 000 nucleotides. Under these circumstances the sequence work on plant viral RNA’s has been aimed at solving relatively limited sequences of strategic importance rather than at trying to sequence the entire molecule. The sequence problems of interest belong to three main categories.

Keywords

Coat Protein Initiation Site Coat Protein Gene Alfalfa Mosaic Virus Brome Mosaic Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Briand
    • 1
  • C. Fritsch
    • 1
  • H. Guilley
    • 1
  • G. Jonard
    • 1
  • C. Klein
    • 1
  • D. Lamy
    • 1
  • K. Richards
    • 1
  • L. Hirth
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de VirologieInstitut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du CNRSStrasbourgFrance

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