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Studies on the Molecular Properties of Nerve Growth Factor and its Cellular Biosynthesis and Secretion

  • Michael Young
  • Richard A. Murphy
  • Judith D. Saide
  • Nicholas J. Pantazis
  • Muriel H. Blanchard
  • Barry G. W. Arnason
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 11)

Abstract

In the preceding chapter, Bradshaw et al. have summarized much of the historical background information arising from the discovery of and early studies on nerve growth factor (NGF) by Bueker and by Levi-Montalcini, Hamburger and their colleagues. Here we should only like to draw attention to a brief list of those historical aspects which are most pertinent to the studies to be presented below.
  1. 1.

    NGF was first discovered as a soluble diffusible factor present in 2 mouse sarcomas. This factor has never been isolated and purified, and thus its chemical properties are unknown.

     
  2. 2.

    Male adult mouse submandibular glands contain large amounts of NGF, whose covalent structure is known, and male glands contain much more than female glands.

     
  3. 3.

    Little, if any, NGF is present in the glands of newborn mice--a perplexing observation since the factor is believed to play a central role in the embryonic development of the autonomic and sensory nervous systems.

     
  4. 4.

    Removal of mouse submandibular glands appears to have no obvious deleterious effect upon the animal—and NGF has not been detected in the salivary glands of other mammals.

     
  5. 5.

    Treatment of newborn mice with antibody to NGF results in selective destruction of the sympathetic nervous system without other obvious pathologic changes.

     
  6. 6.

    Small amounts of a nerve growth-promoting activity have been found in experimentally-induced granulation tissue, serum, and many peripheral tissues—for reasons unknown.

     

Keywords

Nerve Growth Factor Immunoreactive Material Female Gland Mouse Submandibular Gland Nerve Growth Factor Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Young
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Richard A. Murphy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Judith D. Saide
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Nicholas J. Pantazis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Muriel H. Blanchard
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Barry G. W. Arnason
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biological ChemistryHarvard Medical School and the Massachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineHarvard Medical School and the Massachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyHarvard Medical School and the Massachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA

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