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Opening Address

  • Antonio Ciccarone
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 10)

Abstract

To open this Institute is not an easy task, if the introduction is not limited to a hearty welcome, but the idea of the organizers, whom I thank most sincerely for the honour conferred upon me, is that my talk has some technical content. They also suggested that I speak generally on specificity, speciation and taxonomy. This is rather hard for a plant pathologist such as I am, so I hope you will listen sympathetically to a somewhat indisciplined discourse in mycological plant pathology, and a somewhat careful approach to the main theme of the Institute.

Keywords

Powdery Mildew Powdery Mildew Fungus Obligate Parasite Smut Fungus Opening Address 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonio Ciccarone
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Patologia vegetale dell’ UniversitàBariItaly

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